A PHOTOGRAPH CAN CAPTURE AND ARTICULATE THE SOUL WITHOUT A SINGLE WORD. THE SPIRIT OF SURFING UNDOUBTEDLY CAPTURES THE GENUINE DEFINITION. THESE PHOTOGRAPHERS SHARE THEIR HONESTY WITH A SOCIETY THAT SO NEEDS TO REMEMBER WHAT BEAUTY IS.

THE LOST & FOUND COLLECTION VOLUME: I

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Roughly eight years ago, commercial film editor Doug Walker found himself experiencing a crossroads; he was craving a return to his beach culture roots. It was around this time when his wife handed him the gift of a video camera with the simple request to go out and create something he loved. The very next day, Walker traveled to Southern California; unbeknownst to him, the trip would change his life forever.

THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

Bob Barbour

From Southern California to Santa Cruz to Hawaii, Bob Barbour has photographed not only inspiration but images of history relevant to the art world. His work shows his passion for photographing the best image his eye could see.

Lance Trout

Growing up in Florida he would never expect to find himself in Hawaii with a camera capturing history, yet that was Lance Trouts path. He observed and documented his work from the distinctive perspective, capturing history with true honesty.

Shirley Rogers

She was the beauty on the beach and yes, she had a camera. Her images stand out because of the unique vantage point from the water’s edge focusing squarely on the surrounding. Her timeless images capture the true beauty around her.

Tim Bernardy

I graduated from high school in 1970 and lived in a VW bus at Ala Moana Park that summer, surfing the South Shore but not shooting it, says Southern Californian Tim Bernardy. I picked up photography at CSUF, while working towards a major in journalism, and began shooting on our trips to Ensenada.

Ralph Cipolla

Growing up in New Jersey Ralph found his way to Hawaii in the 1970’s, a fulfillment of his lifelong dream. He shares these memories thru his photography. His work was shot from the hip in a voyeuristic way making his images unique and poignant.

Larry Flame Moore

Larry Flame Moore became a dedicated surfer during his teenage years, despite living in inland Whittier, California. If He couldn't get a ride to the beach, Larry gladly took the long ride on the bus. Moore attended college at California State University at Long Beach, majoring in health education with a minor in photography.

John Jones

As the crowds exit the North Shore every year, John Jones captured moments that many people have never seen. Raising his family at Rocky Point, and exposing them to the sea, each child matured into the surfing world. We are so honored to bring John’s work to life and let his images speak for themselves.

Larry Pierce

Inspired by his brother who purchased his first camera and then seeking every opportunity to take photos on the North Shore during the 1970’s. When a package of six rolls of film showed up at his home in Hawaii from Larry Flame Moore he felt like he was really making an impact in the surfing world.

Col. Albert Benson

His stories resonate along the north shore in a magical way. He was a father and a teacher to so many. He not only embraced aloha but lived the definition of what it stands for. His work reflects a museum quality of surfing's evolution from the Aikau Family, Aussies and Hawaiians.

We have made a Line of clothing that evokes how special our past is.

Preserving and archiving history for generations to come.

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These forgotten and mostly never seen-before film libraries are a  time capsule of a high water mark in beach counterculture, revering the photography as gallery worthy artwork surpassing its surf origins.

In 2011, he released the Lost and Found movie, a homage to a handful of the photographers and surfers featured in the archive. Reaction to the movie and the intriguing events leading up to it were inspiring; and what Walker thought would be the end of his Lost and Found voyage was just the beginning.

“It is time to honor and respect our heroes.”

Presently, The Lost and Found Collection is immensely excited to be creating a large format coffee-table book in order to give these counterculture photographers a chance to showcase their previously lost artwork. The Lost and Found Collection is continually growing, day by day, and our team is proud to present this archive – a showcase graciously built by working shoulder-to-shoulder with the photographers and surfers toward our dream of giving back to the icons we revere. Viewing the art of these photographers purely in the context of 1970s beach culture is an amazing experience.